John MacArthur: “So how’s Removing Social Justice from the Gospel Working Out for Ya?

In 2018, John MacArthur, a leading evangelical minister created a statement that 12 thousand evangelical ministers signed onto. It reads in part:

“WE DENY that true justice can be culturally defined or that standards of justice that are merely socially constructed can be imposed with the same authority as those that are derived from Scripture. 

“WE DENY that anything else, whether works to be performed or opinions to be held, can be added to the gospel without perverting it into another gospel. This also means that implications and applications of the gospel, such as the obligation to live justly in the world, though legitimate and important in their own right, are not definitional components of the gospel.

“WE DENY that political or social activism should be viewed as integral components of the gospel or primary to the mission of the church…We deny that laws or regulations possess any inherent power to change sinful hearts.

“We reject any teaching that encourages racial groups to view themselves as privileged oppressors or entitled victims of oppression. While we are to weep with those who weep, we deny that a person’s feelings of offense or oppression necessarily prove that someone else is guilty of sinful behaviors, oppression, or prejudice.

“We deny that only those in positions of power are capable of racism, or that individuals of any particular ethnic groups are incapable of racism…And we emphatically deny that lectures on social issues (or activism aimed at reshaping the wider culture) are as vital to the life and health of the church as the preaching of the gospel and the exposition of Scripture. Historically, such things tend to become distractions that inevitably lead to departures from the gospel.

https://statementonsocialjustice.com

My thoughts. 

In removing social justice from the gospel message of the Kingdom of God, by making it a “distraction,” or voluntary, white evangelicals like MacArthur have shown their hand. So while we have evangelicals who are truly sorry for the deaths of blacks like George Floyd the tendency is to see only the individual sin of the police officer and not the systemic racism behind it. This is not surprising as the evangelical emphasis of the born again experience is totally focused on the individual. This bifurcation divorces social responsibility from the Christian message. The end result is that white evangelicals continue to support racist leaders and support legislation designed to silence and marginalize others.

In large part systemic racism happens in America not in spite of Christians, but because of them.

Author: socalkdl

Like so many Evangelicals of late, I have grown weary of the so-called "Culture Wars." I can agree with Philip Yancey in his "Vanishing Grace: Whatever Happened to the Good News," that grace within the church seems to be a vanishing commodity. Although still connected to the Evangelical church I have often felt distant and removed from portions of its theology and interaction with a Post-Christian society. A few years ago I felt it necessary, for my own spiritual health, to step back and "deconstruct" my theological belief set. I had become too enmeshed in the Evangelical "bubble" to honestly and critically assess my conservative theological doctrines. What has followed in the past few years is my own journey of rediscovering the Bible, and, above all, rediscovering God. It has become a journey that still surprises and delights me. Not everything is new. The faith first delivered to me by the Evangelical church has been reaffirmed. The Good News is still the best deal out there. But there have been new discoveries as well. It is my hope that my posts encourage your own questions and reassessments. It is my conviction that, because we see through a mirror darkly, there are questions that are valid to ask, and that we should not be afraid to ask them. God bless you in your own spiritual journeys. Kirk Leavens

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