John MacArthur and the Great Divorce from Social Justice

It’s been a somewhat challenging past three weeks. I injured my back climbing the ladder on our travel trailer and it is taking a month of Sundays to heal. Normally I would have tried to get a couple of posts in by now, but the pain has been too distracting. So instead of a lengthy post addressing the recent “Statement” on Social Justice by conservatives point by point, I will give a broader assessment of what I think are the underlying reasons Evangelicals felt a need to make the Statement in the first place. In doing so I will be using Diana Butler Bass’  Christianity After Religion

If you’ve been following the struggle for control in Evangelical circles you would be aware of the recent attack on “Social Justice,” by Pastor John MacArthur of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, So. CA. A number of excellent responses have been made. Links provided below.  

MacArthur states that they deny “that the postmodern ideologies derived from intersectionality, radical feminism, and critical race theory are consistent with biblical teaching.” 

He goes on to state “Clarity on these issues will fortify believers and churches to withstand an onslaught of dangerous and false teachings that threaten the gospel, misrepresent Scripture, and lead people away from the grace of God in Jesus Christ.”

“Specifically, we are deeply concerned that values borrowed from secular culture are currently undermining Scripture in the areas of race and ethnicity, manhood and womanhood, and human sexuality. The Bible’s teaching on each of these subjects is being challenged under the broad and somewhat nebulous rubric of concern for “social justice.””

The fact that MacArthur fails to define the terms, “intersectionality,” “radical feminism” and “social justice,” I believe is telling, as I do not believe MacArthur himself understands them, nor does he understand the underlying reasons he distrusts modern attempts to achieve social justice. MacArthur’s frame of reference is that of a White male with a successful following, numerous books and a graduate degree from Bob Jones University. He is, to speak, at the top of his game. One of the things about being at the top of the social ladder racially, sexually and gender-wise is one thinks they should define the issues. It’s called speaking from a position of privilege. This is what intersectionality addresses. 

I will not go into the history of Bob Jones University other than to say it was founded on racist, segregationist principals, not the gospel. One can Google it to see its ugly past history. But there are broader issues than just White privilege at play. What I believe we are seeing is something that has played out over and over again, both in ancient Israel and in church history. 

“Woe to you as well, experts in the law!” He replied. “You weigh men down with heavy burdens, but you yourselves will not lift a finger to lighten their load. 47Woe to you! You build tombs for the prophets, but it was your fathers who killed them. 48So you are witnesses who consent to the deeds of your fathers: They killed the prophets, and you build their tombs.…” Luke 11:46-48

What Christians like MacArthur are guilty of is lip service to men like Martin Luther King. While these prophets are alive and calling for social justice the church resists, sometimes violently. Years later they laud the sacrifice and accomplishment of these men and women. It is the height of spiritual blindness.

This, I believe is due to the fact that dominant religious institutions are inherently resistant to the prophetic voice. This was true in Jesus’ day and is just as true today. As Diana Butler Bass states:

“Religious discontent is indistinguishable from the history of spiritual renewal and awakening. Religion is often characterized as contentment, the idea that faith and faithfulness offer peace, security, and certainty. In this mode, God is depicted in kindly ways, the church is an escape from the cares and stresses of the world, and religious leaders as pastors, the caretakers of the flock. Although most faith traditions do offer such surety to believers, religion has another guise as well—the prophetic tradition. In the prophetic mode, faith discomforts the members of community, opens their eyes and hearts to the shortcomings of their own lives and injustice in the world, and presses for human society to more fully embody God’s dream of healing and love for all peoples.

Religious faiths struggle between the pastoral and the prophetic, comfort and agitation. In a very real way, institutions are inherently pastoral—they seek to maintain those things that give comfort by baptizing shared values and virtues of a community. They reinforce the way things are (or were) through appeals to divine or supernatural order. They are always slow to change. Institutions resist prophets. Prophets question. They push for things to be different. They push people to behave better toward one another. They want change.”

—Diana Butler Bass, “Christianity After Religion”

In response to the prophetic call, those that hold positions of power, wealth and influence in the church become threatened, fearful and angry. They tend to see the call for social justice as a “competing” philosophy rather than a call for repentance and change within the church. If you have all the right boxes checked off theologically, then why would you need to change something? I would charge that MacArthur and the 4000 signatures that followed are “comfortable” with their religion. And that’s the problem. Jesus didn’t call us to be comfortable. If one is not dissatisfied in some fashion with their religion then they have gotten too comfortable.

Further reading:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/divergence/2018/09/07/the-gospel-is-social-justice/

https://thewitnessbcc.com/an-open-letter-to-john-macarthur-about-social-justice/

https://sojo.net/articles/latest-evangelical-statement-and-history-stumbling-racial-justice

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